Global Art Exhibitions | Jan 2014 Edition

Another Africa’s art exhibition picks this January around the globe from Bregenz, to Cape Town, Dakar, Berlin, New York, Seattle and more contemporary Africana abounds.

In this January issue our recommended exhibitions explore current themes that include prejudice, civil rights and liberties, colonialism and the post-colonial state. Highlights include the retrospective of Ernest Mancoba in Cape Town, the seminal artist’s works have not been shown in South Africa for more than twenty years.

Discover the discourse within the realm of contemporary Africana, the topics and intellectual spaces being interrogated by artists and curators actively widening the intellectual field and encouraging dialogue.

 

BREGENZ

 

Kunsthaus Bregenz | Pascale Marthine Tayou | I love you!
Jan.25 ~ Apr.27

© Pascale Marthine Tayou. Kids Mascarade, 2009.Courtesy of GALLERIA CONTINUA,

© Pascale Marthine Tayou. Kids Mascarade, 2009. Photo: Pascale Marthine Tayou.
Courtesy of GALLERIA CONTINUA, San Gimignano | Beijing | Le Moulin © Bildrecht, Vienna, 2013.

I love you! is artist Pascale Marthine Tayou’s first large-scale solo exhibition in Austria. What does it mean when Tayou titles his Kunsthaus Bregenz exhibition I love you!? Is he referring to the group exhibition Love is Colder than Capital that took place at the same venue? Or is it a declaration of love addressed to the institution? The emotional exuberance the title expresses is conveyed by his solo exhibition specifically conceived for Kunsthaus Bregenz, with its profuse and lavish presentation uniting diverse media from drawings and objects to large-scale spatial installations. As he often does, Pascale Marthine Tayou will be using numerous people of different ages and from a range of social and professional backgrounds to help him realize his works in Bregenz. The procedure illustrates Tayou’s distrust of a heroic image of the artist that sees the author as a detached, aloof figure, as well as revealing his genuine interest in other people. The title of his Bregenz exhibition could also be interpreted in such a manner.

Event | Jan.25 Lecture with by the artist, Pascale Marthine Tayou

Kunsthaus Bregnez | Karl-Tizian-Platz, 6900 Bregenz, Austria | more info | facebook

 

BERLIN

 

SAVVY Contemporary | Perhaps All the Dragons in our Lives are Princesses – On Somatic Morphing
Jan.19 ~ Feb.15

© Iké Udé. Sartorial Anarchy #5, 2013. Courtesy of Leila Heller Gallery.

© Iké Udé. Sartorial Anarchy #5, 2013. Courtesy of Leila Heller Gallery.

The exhibition Perhaps all the Dragons in Our Lives are Princesses aims at examining the ways in which the appropriation and exploration of alternative identities, i.e. conscious “impersonation”, conduce the (in-)cognisant revelation of the paradoxes of personhood and society. Framed around concepts of “corporeality”, “personality” and “materiality”, the exhibition brings together live performances, photography, videos and installations that investigate the desire to pass as someone or something else, i.e. the concept of somatic morphing.

Artists | Athi-Patra Ruga, Mariechen Danz, Johannes Paul Raether, Iké Udé

Event | Jan.22 7pm
Athi-Patra Ruga performs The Future White Women of Azania

SAVVY Contemporary | Richardstr. 20 I 12043 Berlin, Germany | more info | facebook

 


 

Wentrep Gallery | Zanele Muholi | Selected Faces & Phases and Beulahs
Jan.21 ~ Feb.28

© Zanele Muholi. Marcel Kutumela, Alexandra, Johannesburg, 2008. Courtesy of Stevenson Johannesburg | Cape Town.

© Zanele Muholi. Marcel Kutumela, Alexandra, Johannesburg, 2008. Courtesy of Stevenson Johannesburg | Cape Town.

“We live in fear,” Muholi said. “And what are we doing about it? You have to document. You are forced to document.” Art as a means to effect political and social change constantly raises the question as to what role the artist can play. Zanele Muholi is a South African photographer who sees herself as a “visual activist” and, since her participation in documenta 13, she has also been known as an advocate for the LGBTI communities. The solo exhibition features selections from three groups of Muholi’s works: black-and-white portraits from her ongoing project Faces and Phases, a sequence of color photographs from the Beulah series, and a documentary video work.

Wentrep Gallery | Tempelhofer Ufer 22, 10963 Berlin-Kreuzberg, Germany | more info | facebook

 

CAPE TOWN

 

Blank Projects | Half-Devil and Half-Child
Jan.23 ~ Feb.22

© Michael MacGarry, The Battle of Algiers (2012-2014). Courtesy of Blank Projects.

© Michael MacGarry, The Battle of Algiers (2012-2014). Courtesy of Blank Projects.

Half-Devil and Half-Child is an exhibition featuring the works of four artists exploring Colonialism and Postcolonialism in their practice. What is “postcolonial”? It seems to mean so much and nothing all at once. There is an entire field of creative and critical cultural production that is deemed “postcolonial”. It has become the label of a body of scholarship that includes work on the Raj in India, customary law in Africa, and Irish nationalism. For some it signifies the end of formal colonial rule and the founding of new nations. For others it represents liminal spaces, where innocence and trauma are neighbours. Still there’s an incompleteness to it. A limit to what it can hold of the time and space it wefts together; our now. It is a state of perpetual abeyance. There is no new place at which we may arrive; there is only post-colonial. It is a state of absence.

Artists | Andrew Gilbert, Michael MacGarry, Turiya Magadlela and Thembalakh

Blank Projects | 113-115 Sir Lowry Road, Woodstock, Cape Town, South Africa | more info | facebook

 


 

Stevenson Gallery | Ernest Mancoba, Wonga Mancoba, Sonja Ferlov Mancoba EWS
~ Feb.22

© Ernest Mancoba. Untitled, undated. Courtesy of Stevenson Cape Town | Johannesburg.

© Ernest Mancoba. Untitled, undated. Courtesy of Stevenson Cape Town | Johannesburg.

STEVENSON presents an exhibition in partnership with Galerie Mikael Andersen, Copenhagen and Berlin, of works from the Estates of Ernest Mancoba, his wife Sonja Ferlov and their son Wonga. Ernest Mancoba is arguably the most important modern artist from South Africa, and perhaps Africa, yet unlike some of his contemporaries like Gerard Sekoto, his work has not received widespread critical revaluation. This occasion is the first time these works have been exhibited in Africa, 20 years after the retrospective exhibition of Mancoba and Ferlov’s work at the Johannesburg Art Gallery and the South African National Gallery in Cape Town in 1994, which was the only time Ernest Mancoba returned to South Africa from exile.

Stevenson | Buchanan Building, 160 Sir Lowry Road, Woodstock 7925, Cape Town, South Africa | More info

 

CHAMPAIGN

 

Krannert Art Museum | Auto-Graphics: Recent Drawings by Victor Ekpuk
Jan.24 ~ Jul.27

© Victor Ekpu. Composition No. 10, ca. 2011. Courtesy of the artist.

© Victor Ekpu. Composition No. 10, ca. 2011. Courtesy of the artist.

Nigerian-born artist Victor Ekpuk is best known for his improvisational use of Nsibidi, a form of ideographic writing associated with the powerful Ekpe men’s association of southeastern Nigeria. In recent years, Ekpuk’s approach to mark making has come to flourish through his investigations of scale, motion, surface, and form. Auto-Graphics features selections from several of Ekpuk’s new bodies of work, including collage, digital prints, and his supersized drawings—bold, vibrant, yet restrained compositions in which Nsibidi signs are cropped, abstracted, and glided beyond the frame through the illusion of magnification.

Krannert Art Museum and Kinkead Pavilion | 500 East Peabody Drive, Champaign, Illinois 61820, United States | More info | facebook

 

DAKAR

 

Raw Material | Who Said It Was Simple*
Jan.28 ~ Mar.29

Courtesy of Raw Material Company.

  Courtesy of Raw Material Company.

Who Said It Was Simple* marks the beginning of Raw Material’s year long program dedicated to personal liberties, their perceptions and restrictions. The program will offer exhibitions, seminars, screenings, laboratories and produce new knowledge for a final publication. Who Said It Was Simple, the first act of this set of activities, curated by Eva Barois De Caevel, focuses on news media as a basis to question how minorities or expressions in the margins are treated in Senegal and Africa today. Who Said It Was Simple is an open critical platform. Abundant documentation including news clips, audio and video material as well as mappings from various sources builds the content of the exhibition. Through a large body of research, Raw Material aims to elict discussions on difference, minority and margins with an emphasis on sexuality. The exhibition also raises a more crucial question: how to defend human rights and provide the ground for respect and dignity when concepts of personal liberties are determined by a complex legacy as well as by contemporary forms of social conditioning?

Raw Material Company | 4074 bis Sicap Amitié 2 BP 22710 Dakar, Senegal | More info | facebook

 

DUBAI

 

Lawrie Shabibi | Asad Faulwell | Bed of Broken Mirrors
~ Feb.12

© Asad Faulwell. Les Femmes D Alger #32. Courtesy of the artist.

© Asad Faulwell. Les Femmes D Alger #32. Courtesy of the artist.

Bed of Broken Mirrors, is artist Asad Faulwell’s first solo exhibition at Lawrie Shabibi. It presents Les Femmes d’Alger, his celebrated ongoing series commemorating Algerian women, these largely unsung figures. Faulwell wryly references French Orientalist painting tradition, in particular Delacroix’s famous 1834 painting of the same name and Picasso’s 1954 homage to it. Whilst those artists depicted Algerian women as exotic, sexual objects, Faulwell draws his inspiration from Gillo Pontecorvo’s 1966 film The Battle of Algiers, paying homage to their largely forgotten legacy: their fight against French occupation during the 1954–1966 Algerian war of independence.

Lawrie Shabibi | Alserkal Avenue, Unit 21, Al Quoz Dubai UAE | more info | facebook

 

LONDON

 

Rivington Place| ‘When Harmony Went to Hell’ Congo Dialogues: Alice Seeley-Harris and Sammy Baloji
~ Mar.7

Alice Seeley Harris, Manacled members of a chain gang at Bauliri. A common punishment for not paying taxes, Congo Free State, c. 1904. Courtesy Anti-Slavery International / Autograph ABP.

Alice Seeley Harris, Manacled members of a chain gang at Bauliri. A common punishment for not paying taxes, Congo Free State, c. 1904.
Courtesy Anti-Slavery International / Autograph ABP.

Autograph ABP presents a rarely seen archive dating from 1904, created by English missionary Alice Seeley Harris in the Congo Free State. These pioneering photographs publicly exposed the violent consequences of human rights abuses at the turn of the century, and are exhibited alongside newly commissioned work from acclaimed contemporary Congolese artist Sammy Baloji who continues to investigate the colonial legacies and fractured histories that haunt contemporary Congolese society.

Event Highlights | Congo Dialogues public programme
Jan.23 Panel Discussion – Politics of the Congo, Now and Then
Feb.1 Curator’s Exhibition Tour
Feb.6 Keynote Lecture & Roundtable on Photography and Violence
Feb.27 Film Screening & In Conversation

Rivington Place | London EC2A 3BA, United Kingdom | more info

 


 

Tiwani Contemporary | Andrew Esiebo: Pride

~ Feb.8

© Andrew Esiebo. Nuances, Accra, no.7, 2012. Courtesy of Tiwani Contemporary.

© Andrew Esiebo. Nuances, Accra, no.7, 2012. Courtesy of Tiwani Contemporary.

Pride, a solo exhibition by Nigerian photographer Andrew Esiebo on barbershops across eight west African cities (Lagos, Cotonou, Accra, Abidjan, Monrovia, Bamako, Dakar and Nouakchott). The selection includes images that have never been exhibited and is Esiebo’s first solo exhibition in London. Pride is a photographic investigation of the relationship between hairstyles as well as individual and collective identities. The exhibition positions four bodies of work as interlocutors to explore lapses in current narratives about African males.

Event | Sat. Jan.18 3pm
Join artist Andrew Esiebo for a guided tour and discussion. Rsvp required.

Tiwani Contemporary | 16 Little Portland Street London W1W 8BP | more info | facebook

 

PARIS

 

Galerie Philippe Lawson | Bruno Boudjelal and Nii Obodai | Who Knows Tomorrow?
Jan.23 ~ Feb.8

©Nii Obodai. Girl and Boy, series 1966, Who Knows Tomorrow. Courtesy of the artist.

Galerie Philippe Lawson presents the photographic exhibition, Who Knows Tomorrow? The Ghanaian journey. The images document a three year journey and photographic exploration of Ghana’s rural and urban terrain undertaken by photographers Nii Obodai (Ghana) and Brundo Boudejlal (France – Algeria).

Galerie Philippe Lawson | 16 rue des Carmes, 25005 Paris, France | more info

 


 

Yvon Lambert| Mounir Fatmi: They were blind, they only saw images
Jan.30 ~ Feb.28

© Mounir Fatmi, Divine illusion, 2013. Courtesy Galerie Yvon Lambert, Paris.

© Mounir Fatmi, Divine illusion, 2013. Courtesy Galerie Yvon Lambert, Paris.

They were blind, they only saw images, the first exhibition of Mounir Fatmi at Yvon Lambert. For this occasion,the Moroccan artist will present a series of new works questioning through identity and controversy the paradoxes of representations of the Sacred. By media, as installation, video, prints or performance, he continues his exploration of different types of language from mystical texts of Sufism, essays of Spinoza or the controversial writings of Salman Rushdie. Fatmi makes visible to the spectator the paradoxical aspect of our understanding of images. With this exhibition, he invites us to take part in sensory journey, going over the simple act of seeing,in a place where the dialog between the physical and metaphysical can take place.

Yvon Lambert  | 108, rue Vieille du Temple, 75003 Paris | more info | facebook

 

PHILADELPHIA

 

The Barnes Foundation | Yinka Shonibare MBE | Magic Ladders’
Jan.24 ~ Apr.21

©Yinka Shonibare MBE. Planets in My Head, Physics, 2011. Courtesy of the artist.

©Yinka Shonibare MBE. Planets in My Head, Physics, 2011. Courtesy of the artist.

Yinka Shonibare MBE’s work alludes to European art and intellectual history and explores race, slavery, authenticity, and commerce. The works in the exhibition—approximately 15 sculptures, paintings, photographs, and a room installation—address themes of education, opportunity, and scientific and cultural discovery. This is the artist’s first major exhibition in Philadelphia, since his residency at the Fabric Workshop and Museum in 2004 and it includes a commission entitled Magic Ladders.

Event | Jan.24 | 6:30–7:30 pm
Yinka Shonibare in Conversation
Shonibare discusses his work with Princeton’s Laurance S. Rockefeller University Professor of Philosophy Kwame Anthony Appiah.

The Barnes Foundation | 2025 Benjamin Franklin Parkway | Philadelphia, PA 19130, USA | more info | facebook

 

NEW YORK

 

Jack Shainman Gallery | Jackie Nickerson | Terrain
Jan.24 ~ Jul.27

© Jackie Nickerson. Terrain, Oscar, 2012. Courtesy of the artist.

© Jackie Nickerson. Terrain, Oscar, 2012. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery.

Terrain, the title of Jackie Nickerson’s latest series of photographs taken in Kenya, Zambia, Zimbabwe and South Africa. The oeuvreis an investigation into the relationship between individuals and the landscape in relation to food production and farming practices. In these photographs, utilitarian and natural objects have been stacked, coiled, balanced and held, obstructing the subject and forming classical geometric compositions. Nickerson’s sculptural, hybrid beings provide as much visual information on food cultivation as they do about the people depicted.

 Jack Shainman Gallery | 513 West 20th Street, New York | More info | facebook

 

SEATTLE

 

M.I.A. GALLERY | Albus
Jan.30 ~ Feb.28

© Justin Dingwall/Thando Hopa, Untitled (Prayer), 2013. Courtesy MIA Gallery.

© Justin Dingwall/Thando Hopa, Untitled (Prayer), 2013. Courtesy MIA Gallery.

Albus is South African photographer, Justin Dingwall solo exhibition made in collaboration with Thando Hopa. It explores the aesthetics of Albinism in contrast with the idealized perception of beauty. Albinism touches every ethnic group and is characterized by the insufficiency of melanin that determines skin and hair color. Rejected, prejudiced and discriminated individuals suffering from albinism in Southern Africa are likely to become targets and victims of physical attacks and mutilations. The project reflects the ability to look inside ourselves and re-invent norms of beauty.

M.I.A. Gallery | 1203 A Second Avenue Seattle, 98101 WA, USA | more info | facebook

Another Africa © 2017 All Rights Reserved