Diptych Part IV | Masquerade Pantomimicry

Masquerade Pantomimicry‘, inspired by West African masqueraders.   A collaboration project with K.L.V.

On view, the ingenuity of African masqueraders, gleaning mother nature’s closet to create visually arresting disguises.  Juxtaposed with contemporary art and fashion images, the pairings highlight the qualities that connect, complement and contrast, but ultimately celebrate creative ingenuity.

This the final edition of the diptych series.

 

Diptych.four

 

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(L) Phyllis Galembo, Baby Dance of Etikpe, Cross River, Nigeria, 2004.  Image courtesy of the artist and Tang Museum.

(R) Vogue Homme Japan Beauty.  Photo  | Willam Selden. Styling | Nicola Formichetti. Hair & Make-up | Katsuya Kamo. Photo courtesy of Vogue Homme Japan.

 

 

(L) Photo courtesy of Eliot, Elisofon and The National Museum of African Art, Washington, D.C.
Masked performers wearing Chi wara headdresses known as N’Gonzon Koun (antelope) circa Bamako, Mali, 1970.

(R) Bamana Chi wara pair from Mali. Image courtesy of Discover African Art.

 

 

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(L) Phyllis Galembo, Affianwan, Calabar South, Nigeria, 2005. Image courtesy of the artist and Tang Museum.

(R) White Crested Black Polish Hen, Studio Series. Image courtesy of My Pet Chicken.

 

 

(L) Phyllis Galembo, Panther Masquerade, Samaga Village, Burkina Faso, 2006. Image courtesy of the artist and Tang Museum.

(R) Agate Drusy Ring by Joya, South Africa

 

 

(L) Phyllis Galembo,, Jaquar style of Ekong-Itaghafon, Calabar, Nigeria, 2005. Image courtesy of the artist and Tang Museum.

(R) Image credit unknown | source | barriobajero

 

 

(L) Phyllis Galembo,  Ngar Ball Traditional Masquerade Dance, Cross River, Nigeria, 2004. Image courtesy of the artist and Tang Museum.

(R) Issey Miyake by Irving Penn, S/S 1994 – The Flying Saucer.

 

 

(L) Phyllis Galembo, Egungun, Djidjimbo Safou Ognon Warrior, Adandokpodji Village, Benin, 2006. Image courtesy of the artist and Tang Museum.

(R) Gabríela Friðriksdóttir , Endless Light. Courtesy of the artist and Osram.

 

 

(L)  Phyllis Galembo Burkina Faso, 2006. Image courtesy of the artist and LN-CC.

(R) AKATRE, Kreyol Factory, Contest for La Vilette.

 

 

(L)  Phyllis Galembo, Ekpe, Calabar South, Nigeria, 2005. Image courtesy of the artist and Tang Museum.

(R) Francis Montesinos, A | W 2009. Source | Trend De La Creme.

 

 

(L)  Phyllis Galembo, Atam Masquerader, Alok Village, Nigeria, 2004. Image courtesy of the artist and Tang Museum.

(R) Nicole Dextras, Cabbage Smock, Weedrobes Wardrobes, Weedrobes – Summer. Image courtesy of the artist.

 

 

(L)  Phyllis Galembo, Gwarama Masquerade, Yegueresso Village, Burkina Faso, 2006. Image courtesy of the artist and Tang Museum.

(R) Yam & Walnut packaging, Package Design in Japan, Taschen, 1989.

 

 

(L) The Beri – Nyna, or men’s devil of Western Liberia (The Bundu of Sierra Leone), circa 1906. Source |  NYPL Digital Gallery.

(R)Walter Van Beirendonck, Paris, A/W 2011 Menswear.  Photo: Umberto Fratini / GoRunway.com. Courtesy of style.com

 

About

UK based milliner Keiron LeVine,  K.L.V. is captivated by the rich and diverse animal kingdom, drawing inspiration from it constantly, and strongly believing in the natural world’s importance to the arts, fashion and indeed life in general. He graduated in Illustration which informed his passion for body adornment in the form of collage, with particular importance to the head. After university, K.L.V. began creating 3-Dimensional headwear from paper or collage, some of which were featured in Winchester Fashion Week 2011. K.L.V.’s love for headwear was intensified upon beginning a millinery internship, where he learnt a wealth of traditional techniques allowing him to appreciate the true art of the hat. Since then K.L.V. has released his first independent headwear collection entitled ‘Ancestors’, inspired by the intrinsic link between human, animal and adornment.

itsfine-levine.blogspot.com

 

 

  • http://museorigins.net/diptychs-pantomimicry/ Diptychs: Pantomimicry – Muse Origins

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