Diptych Part I | Masquerade Pantomimicry

Culture and human curiosity appear to collide  most magnificently in the world of masquerade. Masked forms with eyes shrouded, evoking mystery and wonderment.  

Delving into this rich depository of human imagination, the explosion of creativity and sheer genius is awe-striking. It is a reminder that we can draw so much inspiration from nature, in form and material whether it be to transform raffia into a skirt or collar; the most essential element being creative abandon.

 K.L.V and Another Africa have collaborated on a series of diptychs, this the first, juxtaposing visuals of African masqueraders with contemporary images from the worlds of art and fashion. The pairings, highlighting the qualities that connect, complement and contrast.

Venerating the masqueraders, images are paired with works by artists matching equally in creative prowess from the Chi Wara donned men of Mali to the imagery of legendary art director, Serge Lutens who emblazoned Shiseido in the mind of fashion-readers around the globe during the 80′s.

These diptych images highlight creativity, hurling us forward into a playful take on the art form of disguise, and the freedom it lends to assume an imaginary persona.

 

Diptych.one

 

2a1-aa-klv-diptique

(L) Photo courtesy of Simon Ottenberg and The National Museum of African Art, Washington, D.C. Player toward the end of the line at an Njenji parade, dressed as a missionary and wearing Beke mask of the Igbo people circa Ukpa village, Afikpo area, Nigeria, 1959-1960.

(R) Kevin Mackintosh, Monsters and Props, 2011. Editorial in Wonderland Magazine.

 

 

(R) Masquerade image, author unknown. Source | artismyhustle.

(L) Author unknown

 

 

(L) Photo courtesy of Eliot, Elisofon and The National Museum of African Art, Washington, D.C. Igbo mask dancers performing during the Onwa Asaa festival, Ugwuoba village, Nigeria, 1959.

(R) Pieter Hugo, Nollywood Series, Chigozie Nechi. Enugu, Nigeria, 2009. Courtesy of the artist and Steveson Gallery.

 

(L) Photo courtesy of Eliot, Elisofon and The National Museum of African Art, Washington, D.C. Minganji masqueraders from the Pende peoples circa near Gungu, Democratic Republic of Congo, 1970. The Minganji mask’s primary role is as guardian of the initiation encampment embodying death, uncertainty, and darkness.

(R) MARIOS A | W 2011 Banners Collection

 

(L) Photo courtesy of Eliot, Elisofon and The National Museum of African Art, Washington, D.C. Minganji masqueraders from the Pende peoples near Gungu, Democratic Republic of Congo, 1970.

(R) Keith Haring, circa unknown.

 

(L) Photo courtesy of Simon Ottenberg and The National Museum of African Art, Washington, D.C. Logholo masquerader in its variant form known as Okwo in the Njenji parade of the Igbo people circa Ukpa village, Afikpo area, Nigeria, 1959-1960.

(R) Athi-Patra Ruga, The Death of Beiruth 1, 2009. Courtesy of the artist and Whatiftheworld Gallery.

 

((L) Photo courtesy of Léon de photographer Sousberghe. and The National Museum of African Art, Washington, D.C. Masquerade at Ngashi of the Pende people circa Gungu, Democratic Republic of Congo, 1970.

(R) Jean-Paul Goude, Untitled, felt-tip on paper, Paris, 1983.

 

(L) Photo courtesy of Eliot, Elisofon and The National Museum of African Art, Washington, D.C. Dyomo masqueraders during the Dama ceremony circa Sanga, Mali, 1970.

(R) Polly Borland, Bunny Nose, 2009. Courtesy of the artist and Other Criteria, London.

 

 

(L) Photo courtesy of Eliot Elisofon and The National Museum of African Art, Washington, D.C. Masked dancer during a Gelede performance, Meko, Nigeria, 1971.

(R) Madame Peripetie Photography, freak love triangle, December 2010 for Umbigo Magazine, Portugal.

 

 

(L) Pair of Chi wara dancers, Mali. Image courtesy of Dr. Pascal James Imperto, 1970.

(R) Author unknown | source barriobajero

 

(L) Photo courtesy of Eliot, Elisofon and The National Museum of African Art, Washington, D.C. Masked performers wearing Chi wara headdresses known as N’Gonzon Koun (antelope) circa Bamako, Mali, 1970.

(R) Serge Lutens. Image from the book, L’Esprit Serge Lutens: The Spirit of Beauty.

 

About

UK based milliner Keiron LeVine,  K.L.V. is captivated by the rich and diverse animal kingdom, drawing inspiration from it constantly, and strongly believing in the natural world’s importance to the arts, fashion and indeed life in general. He graduated in Illustration which informed his passion for body adornment in the form of collage, with particular importance to the head. After university, K.L.V. began creating 3-Dimensional headwear from paper or collage, some of which were featured in Winchester Fashion Week 2011. K.L.V.’s love for headwear was intensified upon beginning a millinery internship, where he learnt a wealth of traditional techniques allowing him to appreciate the true art of the hat. Since then K.L.V. has released his first independent headwear collection entitled ‘Ancestors’, inspired by the intrinsic link between human, animal and adornment.

itsfine-levine.blogspot.com

  • http://museorigins.net/diptychs-pantomimicry/ Diptychs: Pantomimicry – Muse Origins

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